Is media portrayal of food fueling diet culture?

Is media portrayal of food fueling diet culture?

Journalist Sarah Gill delves into the media’s portrayal of food and how it can play in diet culture.

“There’s nothing here but ice cream, candy bars, cookie dough, and canned frosting – why not 450 pounds?” Gilmore Girlsasks Luke Danes, staring at Lorlei’s refrigerator.

“I know scientists call it the Lorelei Paradox,” the show’s star responded, referring to the miraculous metabolism she and daughter Rory shared, who has appeared in the conversation multiple times over the course of the sitcom’s seventh season. .

The effortlessly dynamic preservation of their characters, despite surviving only from leftovers, burgers, and gallons of black coffee, is amplified by forcing the characters around them to be slimmer, fitter, and healthier.

From Lorlei’s laughter at concierge Michelle’s diet fad to Rory’s annoyance with her college classmate’s exercise routine, it’s clear that the insecurities and ambitions of those not blessed with Gilmore’s genes were simply beyond the understanding of leading ladies.

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Food plays a supporting role in Gilmore Girls. From Friday night dinners and Suki’s kitchen at the inn to Luke’s Diner and Jackson’s Vegetable patch, Stars Hollow hosts a community of passionate foodies.

Just like in the real world, the food in this TV series allows for bonding, a form of socialization, the language of love, and the foundations of community. While it portrays some of our characters as caretakers, we frequently bet the head with a schtick that I can eat whatever I want and not get fatter from the mother-daughter duo.

Don’t get me wrong, everyone metabolizes food at a different rate, and the way our bodies store fat and build muscle can be down to a number of factors, including genes, but that trope is found in film, television, and media as largely as the eye can see.

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It gets even more exacerbated when you compare Lorlei Gilmore’s proudly nonexistent diet and exercise regime to that of the actress who plays the role, Lauren Graham.

Youtuber Jessica Viana has a series on her channel where she dives deep into the nutritional scenes of the actors on some of the most beloved TV shows of the 2000s and the ’90s.

In which Gilmore Girls In the analysis, she found that Graham revealed that she had, in fact, spent most of her life on a strict diet. Graham said US Magazine“I’ve been dieting for 35 years,” since age 11, revealing that she’s found that the less she thinks about food, the happier she is.

According to Vianna, the actress’s workout routine varies from running and trampoline to Pilates and spinning, so it can be fairly concluded that Laurie Gilmore’s slim, toned physique wasn’t a scientific anomaly.

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At more similar times, Megan Fox has sparked similar outrage with an Instagram post featuring her unmistakable six-pack: “I don’t exercise. If God wanted me to bend down, he would have put diamonds on the floor.”

Entire Instagram accounts have been created for models standing side by side with burgers and pizza slices that leave the viewer wondering how they can eat whatever they want and never suffer the consequences, while the innocent spectator has been adapted to fret over every bite, thanks, at any time. A small part, to the media consumed during the formative years.

Look, the toxic diet culture of the 2000s is well documented, and food has always played a major role in the media we consume, whether we realize it firsthand or not. It’s a way to add a layer of subtext to a character, and it gives off a real vibe of masculine gaze energy when looking back into hindsight.

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When the female character separates, she’ll indulge in ice cream straight from the sink, likely have ketchup stained her shirt, likely call a delivery to a restaurant who knows her order by heart, and always assume she’s ordering two.

Persistence of thinness as something ideal and food as something to possess is often written explicitly in the text, but in many cases, food exists as a sub-plot in itself, just under the radar but loud enough to penetrate our subconscious.

She also helped give birth to the “cool girl” metaphor, which, according to the infamous the girl is gone A monologue, involving drinking canned beer, watching Adam Sandler movies, eating cold pizza, and staying a size two.

This is the perfect illusion we have learned to look forward to. An impossible standard that was set without our consent, but still affects our mindsets and our decision-making process, and the hangovers of that culture still cause many to buy a dress a size too small as a form of motivation, while making others experts at assessing calories. The content of the meal at a glance.

Our schedules are saturated What do I eat a day In the videos no one asked for, we got the details of Kim Kardashian’s strict diet in preparation for her MET Gala dress, and the little spaghetti swirls served up at Kravis’ wedding of the century haunt us.

Our relationship with food is a tumultuous one, and we are constantly informed by the media we consume.

From screen to everyday life, food plays a much bigger role than Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs believes. Yes, food provides a source of life’s sustenance, but many of us have a much more complex relationship with these ingredient-packed dishes or late-night snacks. Food can lie in the periphery of our vision like a villain, or provide comfort and support from a loving friend.

If you have been affected by the issues raised in this story, please visit: www.rte.ie/helplines.

The opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not represent or reflect the opinions of RTÉ.


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